Practice Areas

The Law Office of Mihaela Petre is a Washington, D.C. law firm specializing exclusively in U.S. immigration and nationality law. Any information on this website and its associated pages, including articles or other communications, should not be interpreted as legal advice for any particular case. For general information on U.S. immigration law, please explore our areas of practice below, as well as our “Resources” page.

Adjustment of Status (green card)

The “adjustment of status” process allows aliens to obtain U.S. lawful permanent status by processing their request here in the United States, without having to travel abroad to their country of citizenship or residence to apply before a U.S Consulate. A noncitizen can obtain lawful permanent residence through adjustment of status either through USCIS or...

Asylum

An alien who is present in the United States may be granted asylum is he or she qualifies as a “refugee” under the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).  A refugee is defined by the INA as any person who is unable or unwilling to return to its country of nationality because of past persecution or...

Business Immigration

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Citizenship & Naturalization

There are three different ways in which a person can acquire U.S. citizenship: (1) by being born in the United States and subject to the U.S. jurisdiction; (2) by being born abroad and having one or both U.S. citizen parent(s); and (3) through naturalization after holding lawful permanent resident status for a certain period of...

Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA)

The “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals” (DACA) program allows individuals who came to the United States as children and meet certain eligibility criteria to obtain “deferred action” for a period of two years, which can be subsequently renewed. “Deferred action” is a form of prosecutorial discretion by which the Government postpones the act of removing...

Family-based Petitions

U.S. citizens and lawful permanent residents (LPRs) can petition for certain family members in order for these to obtain lawful permanent residence in the United States. Only certain categories of family members can get lawful permanent status through a familial relationship. These are: (1) immediate relatives of U.S. citizens (spouses, children and parents of U.S. citizens), ...

Removal Proceedings (Immigration Court)

Any alien who is not a U.S. citizen (including lawful permanent residents) can be removed from the United States, if the person is found to be inadmissible or deportable. A removal proceeding (formerly called “exclusion” or “deportation”) is instituted by the U.S. government for the purpose of determining whether an alien will be formally removed...

Temporary Protected Status (TPS)

Temporary Protected Status (TPS) allows nationals of certain foreign states to reside and work legally in the United States for a determined period of time (from six to 18 months). The foreign states must be designated by the U.S. government due to extraordinary political or physical circumstances arising in such countries. In order to qualify...

VAWA Petitions

The Violence Against Women Act (VAWA) was enacted in 1994 and its main purpose is to protect immigrants who find themselves in abusive family relationships with US citizens or lawful permanent residents (LPRS). VAWA allows the abused family members to petition for themselves in order to obtain lawful immigration status in the United States, without...

Waivers of Inadmissibility

The necessity of obtaining a waiver of inadmissibility can arise in different scenarios, when a person seeks admission to the United States. In order to gain admission to the United States, an alien needs to be eligible or “admissible”. A person can be found inadmissible for various reasons, including those related to immigration law violations...